Antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts made of mushroom mycelia developed in submerged culture

The ethanolic extracts of dried biomass made of mushroom mycelium produced in the submerged cultures of eight edible/medicinal macromycete species Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma lucidum, Laetiporus sulphureus, Flammulina velutipes, Trametes versicolor, Hericium coralloides, Pleurotus eryngii 2600 and Agaricus campestris were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities. Pathogenic tested microorganisms were represented by five bacteria and two yeasts B.subtilis subsp. spizizenii ATCC 6633, Staphilococcus aureus ATCC6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC9027, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, E.faecalis ATCC 29212, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and Candida parapsilosis CBS604. The mushroom biomass was obtained from segments detached from the mycelium culture grown on solid culture medium (PDA or MEA) placed in Erlenmeyer flasks with a liquid culture medium containing 2% malt extract (ME). After inoculation, the probes were incubated at the temperature of 25°C for 21 days. The obtained biomass was filtered and dried at the temperature of 70°C. The ethanolic extracts were prepared by adding 1 ml of 70% ethyl alcohol to 0.2 g of dried fungal biomass. Antimicrobial activities of the mushroom biomass extracts were evaluated by agar disk diffusion method. The results showed that G. applanatum, L. sulphureus, F. velutipes, T. versicolor, H.coralloides and A. campestris extracts had significant inhibitory activities especially against B. subtilis subsp. spizizenii ATCC 6633 bacterium while G. lucidum and Pleurotus eryngii 2600 extracts had no antimicrobial activity against any pathogenic microorganisms tested in this work. Further investigations will be conducted regarding the antimicrobial activity dependence on the fungal morphological part used in the extract(mycelium/fruiting body) and on the solvent type used for extracts’ preparation.

Nicolcioiu, M., Popa, G., & Matei, F. (2017). Antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts made of mushroom mycelia developed in submerged culture. Scientific Bulletin, 21, 159-164.1